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Just one day before the entire state is scheduled to enter phase 1 of Virginia's reopening phases, the commonwealth on Thursday reported the highest one-day COVID-19 death toll since the pandemic began with 57 new fatalities.

Two of those additional deaths occurred in Prince William County. They were among the 23 new fatalities reported in Northern Virginia.

In the Prince William Health District, the deaths involved one man and one woman, both age 80 or older. The additions bring the local death toll to 117, including 101 in the county, 10 in the City of Manassas and six in Manassas Park.

Local fatalities include those of 61 men and 56 women. They include: two residents in their 30s; four in their 40s; seven in their 50s; 24 in their 60s; 30 in their 70s; and 50 age 80 and older.

Meanwhile, Virginia again reported more than 1,000 new COVID-19 cases across the state. On Thursday, the state added 1,152 new COVID-19 cases, 57 hospitalizations and 57 deaths.

The additions bring the state's COVID-19 tallies to 41,401 cases, 4,442 hospitalizations and 1,338 deaths.

The Prince William Health District, meanwhile, added 89 cases, six hospitalizations and two deaths. The additions bring the local COVID-19 tallies to 6,409 cases, 532 hospitalizations and 117 deaths. 

Percent-positivity rate: One bit of good news in Thursday's report was that both the state and local percent-positivity rates on COVID-19 tests continues to drift downward,

The state's percent-positivity rate is now 13.8%, down from 13.9% on Wednesday. Locally, the Prince William Health District's percent-positivity rate fell to 21.2%, down from 21.5% on Wednesday. 

Prince William, however, continues to have the second-highest percent-positivity rate in the state, behind only the Lord Fairfax Health District. Lord Fairfax posted a percent-positivity rate of 29.2% on Thursday, up from 26.3% on Wednesday. The health district includes Clarke, Frederick, Page, Shenandoah and Warren counties as well as the City of Winchester -- all of which entered phase one of Virginia's reopening phases on Friday, May 15.

Fairfax County remains in third place with a percent-positivity rate of 20.6%.

The percent-positivity rate fluctuates daily depending on the number of tests administered and the positive results. 

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of the key measures the Northam's administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia's three reopening phases. 

Northern Virginia cases, deaths: COVID-19 is blamed for 734 deaths in Northern Virginia. They include 44 in Alexandria, up two; 109 in Arlington, unchanged; 371 in Fairfax County, up seven; six in Fairfax City, up two; eight in Falls Church, unchanged; six in Fauquier County, up one; 63 in Loudoun County, up 10; 10 in the City of Manassas, unchanged; six in Manassas Park, unchanged; 101 in Prince William County, up two; four in Stafford County, unchanged; and six in Spotsylvania County, also unchanged.

Hospitalizations: Also, on Thursday, hospitalizations were up again across the state, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association. There were 1,502 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across Virginia, up 43 from Wednesday, with 416 in intensive care units, up 26, and 195 on ventilators, down eight.

Also, 5,472 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Thursday, up 105 in 24 hours.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 24,876 cases of COVID-19. 

They include 1,887 in Alexandria, up 63; 2,039 in Arlington, up 51; 971 in the City of Manassas, up five; 281 in Manassas Park, up one; and 10,503 in Fairfax County, up 434.

Meanwhile, there are now 303 cases in Fauquier County, up one; 2,318 in Loudoun County, up 44; 5,157 in Prince William County, up 83; 487 in Spotsylvania County, up 13; and 672 in Stafford County, up 15.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 20 to 59

On Thursday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19 cases, with 1,408, up 12 from Wednesday. The age group makes up 22.3%, of the county's total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 104 have been hospitalized, up two, and four have died, which is unchanged in the last 24 hours.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 1,205, up 15 from Wednesday. The age group makes up 19.1% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 65 have been hospitalized and two have died, both of which are unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the third-highest number of cases with 1,131, up 20 from Wednesday. Residents in their 20s make up 17.9% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 32 have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged from Wednesday.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 1,045, up 16 from Wednesday. Residents in their 50s make up 16.5% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 123 have been hospitalized, up one, and seven have died, unchanged from Wednesday.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 408, up 11 from Wednesday. The group makes up 6.5% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county's children -- those ages 9 and younger -- accounted for 210 cases, up five from Wednesday. Children under 9 comprise 3.3% of the county's total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 210 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, five have been hospitalized, up two from Wednesday, and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 568, up seven from Wednesday. The age group makes up 9%, of the county's total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 98 have been hospitalized, up one, and 24 have died, unchanged from Wednesday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 195 cases, up three since Wednesday. They comprise 3.1% of the county's total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 195 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 53 have been hospitalized and 30 have died, unchanged in the last 24 hours.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Thursday, 149 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, unchanged in the last 24 hours. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.4% of the county's cases.

Of the 149 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 49 have been hospitalized, up one, and 50 have died, up two from Wednesday.

Wednesday, May 27: Prince William loses 4 more residents to COVID-19, new cases drop to 95

The latest COVID-19 report is a mix of good news and bad: Fewer new COVID-19 cases were reported both locally and across the state on Wednesday, but Prince William County lost another four residents to the disease, including one person in their 40s, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

The latest local COVID-19 fatalities include three residents from Prince William County and one from the City of Manassas. They include one woman and three men. One was in their 40s, one was in their 60s, one was in their 70s and one was 80 or older.

The additions bring Prince William Health District's death toll from COVID-19 to 115. Fatalities include 55 women and 60 men; 99 were residents of the county, 10 of the City of Manassas and six of Manassas Park.

Meanwhile, COVID-19 cases reported across the state topped 40,000 on Wednesday to reach 40,249. That includes 907 new cases, down sharply from more than 1,600 reported on Tuesday. Virginia also reported 60 additional hospitalizations and 45 additional deaths.

The new numbers bring the state's COVID-19 totals to 40,249 cases, 4,385 hospitalizations and 1,281 deaths.

The Prince William Health District added 95 new cases, five new hospitalizations and four additional deaths, bringing the local COVID-19 tallies to 6,320 cases, 526 hospitalizations and 115 deaths. 

Percent-positivity rate: Another bit of good news in Wednesday's report was the local percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests, which dipped again on Wednesday and now stands at 21.5%, down from 22.3% on Tuesday.

Prince William's percent-positivity, however, rose from third to second in the state, behind only Lord Fairfax, which has a rate of 26.3%. Fairfax County, which had been in second place, dropped below Prince William with 21.4% on Wednesday. The Lord Fairfax Health District includes Clarke, Frederick, Page, Shenandoah and Warren counties as well as the City of Winchester -- all of which entered phase one of Virginia's reopening phases on Friday, May 15.

Virginia's statewide percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests also dipped again from 14.1% on Tuesday to 13.9% on Wednesday, the VDH data says.

The percent-positivity rate fluctuates daily depending on the number of tests administered and the positive results. 

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of the key measures the Northam's administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia's three reopening phases. 

Northern Virginia cases, deaths: COVID-19 is blamed for 710 deaths in Northern Virginia. They include 42 in Alexandria, up one; 109 in Arlington, up five; 364 in Fairfax County, up 24; four in Fairfax City, unchanged; eight in Falls Church, up two; five in Fauquier County, unchanged; 53 in Loudoun County, up one; 10 in the City of Manassas, up one; six in Manassas Park, unchanged; 99 in Prince William County, up three; four in Stafford County, unchanged; and six in Spotsylvania County, unchanged.

Hospitalizations: Hospitalizations were up across the state on Wednesday, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association. There were 1,459 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across Virginia, up 56 from Tuesday, with 390 in intensive care units, up 24, and 203 on ventilators, up 13.

Also, 5,367 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Wednesday, May 27, up 153 in 24 hours.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 24,155 cases of COVID-19. 

They include 1,824 in Alexandria, up 39; 1,988 in Arlington, up 53; 966 in the City of Manassas, up 10; 280 in Manassas Park, up three; and 10,069 in Fairfax County, up 230.

Meanwhile, there are now 302 cases in Fauquier County, up two; 2,274 in Loudoun County, up 88; 5,074 in Prince William County, up 82; 474 in Spotsylvania County, up 11; and 657 in Stafford County, up 15.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 20 to 59

On Monday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 1,396, up 27 from Tuesday. The age group makes up 22.4%, of the county's total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 102 have been hospitalized, up three, and four have died, up one from Tuesday.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 1,190, up nine from Tuesday. The age group makes up 19.1% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 65 have been hospitalized and two have died, both of which are unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the third-highest number of cases with 1,111, up 18 from Tuesday. Residents in their 20s make up 17.8% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 32 have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged from Tuesday.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 1,029, up 15 from Tuesday. Residents in their 50s make up 16.5% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 122 have been hospitalized, up two, and seven have died, unchanged from Tuesday.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 397, up nine from Tuesday. The group makes up 6.4% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county's children -- those ages 9 and younger -- accounted for 205 cases, up five from Tuesday. Children under 9 comprise 3.3% of the county's total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 205 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 561, up six from Tuesday. The age group makes up 9%, of the county's total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 97 have been hospitalized, up four, and 24 have died, up one from Tuesday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 192 cases, up three since Tuesday. They comprise 3.1% of the county's total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 192 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 53 have been hospitalized, up one, and 30 have died, up one in the last 24 hours.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Friday, 149 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up three in the past 24 hours. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.4% of the county's cases.

Of the 149 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 49 have been hospitalized, up one, and 48 have died, also up one.

Tuesday, May 26: Prince William adds 413 new COVID-19 cases Tuesday -- a new record -- plus 3 more deaths

New COVID-19 cases spiked again across the state Tuesday, with 413 new cases and three new deaths reported in the Prince William Health District and 1,615 new cases and 28 new deaths reported across the state, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

It's the second-straight day of record-breaking new COVID-19 cases in Virginia. The Prince William Health District also set a new record in new daily cases, topping the previous record of 313 cases set on Monday, May 11.

New deaths reported locally include two in Prince William County and one in Manassas Park. The latest fatalities are all men, including one in their 50s and two in their 60s.

Local deaths: The new numbers bring the Prince William Health District's death toll to 111. The three deaths reported on Tuesday follow the 20 reported locally over the Memorial Day weekend. Those 20 included five women and 15 men, including one in their 30s, one in their 40s, two in their 50s, six in their 60s, five in their 70s and five age 80 or older. 

Because of privacy laws, the state releases only limited information about COVID-19 victims, such as gender, age range (within 10 years) and place of residence.

The new numbers bring the Prince William Health District's cumulative COVID-19 numbers to 6,225 cases, 521 hospitalizations and 111 deaths.

Statewide, the daily additions bring the total number of COVID-19 cases to 39,342, the number of hospitalizations to 4,325, up 56, and the number of deaths across the state to 1,236, up 28.

Tests: The jump in cases across the state coincides with a sharp uptick in daily tests. Virginia administered 11,874 COVID-19 tests across the state on Friday, May 22, according to the latest VDH report. That's the largest number of daily tests ever reported and the first day that testing exceeded Northam's goal of 10,000 daily tests.

Locally, the Prince William Health District reported 1,960 tests on Friday, May 22, which far exceeds any previous one-day record. Since the pandemic began, the Prince William Health District has processed 22,558 tests.

Percent-positivity rate: The local health district's percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests dipped again on Tuesday and now stands at 22.3%, according to the VDH report.

Prince William's percent-positivity rate is now third in the state, behind Lord Fairfax, which has a rate of 25.5% and Fairfax County, which reported a rate of 22.4% on Tuesday. The Lord Fairfax Health District includes Clarke, Frederick, Page, Shenandoah and Warren counties as well as the City of Winchester -- all of which entered phase one of Virginia's reopening phases on Friday, May 15.

Virginia's percent-positivity rate also dipped slightly from 14.3% on Monday to 14.1% on Tuesday, the VDH data says.

The percent-positivity rate fluctuates daily depending on the number of tests administered and the positive results. 

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of five key measures the Northam's administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia's three reopening phases. 

Northern Virginia cases, deaths: COVID-19 is blamed for 673 deaths in Northern Virginia, up 20 from Monday. They include 41 in Alexandria, up three; 104 in Arlington, up three; 340 in Fairfax County, up nine; four in Fairfax City, up one; six in Falls Church, up one; five in Fauquier County, unchanged; 52 in Loudoun County, unchanged; nine in the City of Manassas, unchanged; six in Manassas Park, up one; 96 in Prince William County, up two; four in Stafford County, unchanged; and six in Spotsylvania County, up one.

Hospitalizations: According to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association, there were 1,403 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across the state on Tuesday, up 27 from Monday, with 366 in intensive care units, up 17, and 180 on ventilators, up eight.

Also, 5,227 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Tuesday, May 26, up 82 in 24 hours.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 23,619 cases of COVID-19, up 1,216 in the last 24 hours. 

They include 1,785 in Alexandria, up 31; 1,935 in Arlington, up 38; 956 in the City of Manassas, up 107; 277 in Manassas Park, up 16; and 9,839 in Fairfax County, up 357.

Meanwhile, there are now 300 cases in Fauquier County, up 15; 2,186 in Loudoun County, up 139; 4,992 in Prince William County, up 290; 463 in Spotsylvania County, up 41; and 642 in Stafford County, up 43.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 20 to 59

On Monday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 1,369, up 104 from Monday. The age group makes up 22.3%, of the county's total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 99 have been hospitalized, up two, and three have died, the latter of which is unchanged from Monday.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 1,181, up 71 from Monday. The age group makes up 19.3% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 65 have been hospitalized and two have died, both of which are unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the third-highest number of cases with 1,093, up 85 from Monday. Residents in their 20s make up 17.8% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 32 have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged from Monday.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 1,014, up 54 from Monday. Residents in their 50s make up 16.5% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 122 have been hospitalized, up two, and seven have died, up one from Monday.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 388, up 25 from Monday. The group makes up 6.3% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county's children -- those ages 9 and younger -- accounted for 200 cases, up 20 from Monday. Children under 9 comprise 3.3% of the county's total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 200 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 555 cases, up 33 from Monday. The age group makes up 9%, of the county's total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 97 have been hospitalized, up four, and 23 have died, up two from Monday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 189 cases, up nine since Monday. They comprise 3.1% of the county's total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 189 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 52 have been hospitalized, up one, and 29 have died, which is unchanged in the last 24 hours.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Friday, 146 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up eight in the past 24 hours. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.4% of the county's cases.

Of the 146 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 48 have been hospitalized and 47 have died, both of which are unchanged.

Monday, May 25: Memorial Day marks pandemic's deadliest day in Prince William

After a Sunday lull, the Prince William Health District's COVID-19 numbers spiked again Monday with 13 new fatalities, 11 new hospitalizations and 299 new cases of the disease reported in the past 24 hours, according to the most recent data posted by the Virginia Department of Health.

The sharp increases coincide with largest one-day bump in new COVID-19 cases reported across the state. There were 1,483 new COVID-19 cases reported in Virginia on Monday, along with 55 new hospitalizations and 37 new deaths.

The number of fatalities reported in Virginia over the last 24 hours matches the number reported Friday, May 22, which Gov. Ralph Northam called "concerning." It is the fourth-largest daily death toll since May 3, when the state reported 44 deaths, the highest one-day loss since the pandemic began.

Local deaths: The new numbers bring the Prince William Health District's death toll to 108. Prince William County reported 10 additional deaths, while the city of Manassas reported two and Manassas Park reported one. Monday, Memorial Day, marked the largest number of local COVID-19 deaths reported in a 24-hour period since the pandemic began.

The latest local victims of COVID-19 include four women and nine men. The youngest was in their 40s, while one was in their 50s, five were in their 60s, two were in their 70s and four were age 80 or older, according to the VDH report.

Because of privacy laws, the state releases only limited information about COVID-19 victims, such as gender, age range (within 10 years) and place of residence.

The new numbers bring the Prince William Health District's cumulative COVID-19 numbers to 5,812 cases, 512 hospitalizations and 108 deaths.

Statewide, the daily additions bring the total number of COVID-19 cases to 37,727, the number of hospitalizations to 4,269, and the number of deaths to 1,208.

Tests: The jump in cases across the state coincides with a sharp uptick in daily tests. Virginia administered 11,865 COVID-19 tests across the state on Friday, May 22. That's the largest number of daily tests ever reported and the first day that testing exceeded Northam's goal of 10,000 daily tests.

Locally, the Prince William Health District reported 1,960 tests on Friday, May 22, which far exceeds any previous one-day record. Since the pandemic began, the Prince William Health District has processed 22,105 tests.

Percent-positivity rate: The local health district's percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests dipped again on Monday and now stands at 24%, according to the VDH report.

Prince William's percent-positivity rate remains second only to the Lord Fairfax Health District, which reported a 24.8% positive rate relative to tests, a dip from Sunday's 27.3%. The Lord Fairfax Health District includes Clarke, Frederick, Page, Shenandoah and Warren counties as well as the City of Winchester -- all of which entered phase one of Virginia's reopening phases on Friday, May 15.

Virginia's percent-positivity rate also dipped slightly from 14.4% on Sunday to 14.3% on Monday, the VDH data says.

The percent-positivity rate fluctuates daily depending on the number of tests administered and the positive results. 

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of five key measures the Northam's administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia's three reopening phases. 

Northern Virginia cases, deaths: COVID-19 is blamed for 653 deaths, up 21 from Sunday. They include 38 in Alexandria, unchanged; 101 in Arlington, up three; 331 in Fairfax County, up four; three in Fairfax City, unchanged; five in Falls Church, unchanged; five in Fauquier County, unchanged; 52 in Loudoun County, unchanged; nine in the City of Manassas, up two; five in Manassas Park, up one; 94 in Prince William County, up 10; four in Stafford County, unchanged; and five in Spotsylvania County, unchanged.

Hospitalizations: According to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association, there were 1,376 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across the state on Monday, up 25 from Sunday, with 349 in intensive care units, down five, and 182 on ventilators, down 10.

Also, 5,145 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Monday, May 25, up 43 in 24 hours.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 22,403 cases of COVID-19, up 993 in the last 24 hours. 

They include 1,754 in Alexandria, up 21; 1,897 in Arlington, up 24; 849 in the City of Manassas, up 43; 261 in Manassas Park, up 22; and 9,482 in Fairfax County, up 493.

Meanwhile, there are now 285 cases in Fauquier County, up three; 2,047 in Loudoun County, up 226; 4,702 in Prince William County, up 234; 422 in Spotsylvania County, up 21; and 599 in Stafford County, up 18.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 20 to 59

On Monday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 1,265, up 54 from Sunday. The age group makes up 22.1%, of the county's total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 97 have been hospitalized, up one, and three have died, also up one from Sunday.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 1,110, up 50 from Sunday. The age group makes up 19.4% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 65 have been hospitalized and two have died, both of which are unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the third-highest number of cases with 960, up 46 from Sunday. Residents in their 50s make up 16.8% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 120 have been hospitalized and six have died, both of which are up one from Sunday.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 1,008, up 60 from Sunday. Residents in their 20s make up 17.6% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 32 have been hospitalized, up one, and none have died.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 363, up 23 from Sunday. The group makes up 6.3% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county's children -- those ages 9 and younger -- accounted for 180 cases, up 18 from Sunday. Children under 9 comprise 3.1% of the county's total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 180 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 522 cases, up 28 from Sunday. The age group makes up 9.1%, of the county's total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 93 have been hospitalized, up four, and 21 have died, up five from Sunday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 180 cases, up 11 since Sunday. They comprise 3.1% of the county's total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 180 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 51 have been hospitalized, up one, and 29 have died, up two in the last  24 hours.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Friday, 138 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up four in the past 24 hours. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.4% of the county's cases.

Of the 138 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 48 have been hospitalized, up three, and 47 have died, up four from Sunday.

Sunday, May 24: Prince William Health District adds fewer COVID-19 cases, no new deaths

After losing 17 people to COVID-19 in the past week, the Prince William Health District reported no additional deaths on Sunday. Also, new cases of COVID-19 dropped to 83, about one-third fewer than the 123 new cases reported Saturday.

The local health district's percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests similarly dipped to 25% on Sunday. The new number means Prince William County no longer leads the state on the percent of positive results relative to new COVID-19 tests, according to the latest data released from the Virginia Department of Health.

The Prince William Health District is now in second place behind Lord Fairfax Health District, which led the state with a percent-positivity rate of 27.3% on Sunday, May 24. The Lord Fairfax Health District includes Clarke, Frederick, Page, Shenandoah and Warren counties as well as the City of Winchester -- all of which entered phase one of Virginia's reopening phases on Friday, May 15.

Lord Fairfax Health District's percent-positivity rate rose from 23.5% on May 16 to 27.3% on Sunday. The health district, however, has reported fewer than 100 tests a day over the past week.

The Prince William Health District, in contrast, has been testing about 1,000 people a day in the past week, the VDH report says.

The new numbers bring the Prince William Health District's cumulative COVID-19 numbers to 5,513 cases, 475 hospitalizations and 95 deaths.

Statewide, Virginia on Sunday added 495 new COVID-19 cases, the lowest number since April 13, as well as 33 new hospitalizations and 12 new deaths. The additions bring the state's cumulative COVID-19 tallies to 36,224 cases, 4,214 hospitalizations and 1,171 deaths.

Virginia's percent-positivity rate -- positive cases relative to tests -- dipped slightly from 14.6% on Saturday to on 14.4% Sunday. Virginia, however, has yet to meet Gov. Ralph Northam's goal of administering 10,000 tests a day, the VDH data indicates.

The percent-positivity rate fluctuates daily depending on the number of tests administered and the positive results. 

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of five key measures the Northam's administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia's three reopening phases. 

Northern Virginia cases, deaths: COVID-19 is blamed for 632 deaths, up five from Saturday. They include 38 in Alexandria, unchanged; 98 in Arlington, up three; 327 in Fairfax County, up one; three in Fairfax City, unchanged; five in Falls Church, unchanged; five in Fauquier County, unchanged; 52 in Loudoun County, unchanged; seven in the City of Manassas, unchanged; four in Manassas Park, unchanged; 84 in Prince William County, unchanged; four in Stafford County, unchanged; and five in Spotsylvania County, up one.

Hospitalizations: According to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association, there were 1,351 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across the state on Sunday, down 34 from Saturday, with 354 in intensive care units, up 24, and 192 on ventilators, down 21.

Also, 5,102 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Sunday, May 24, up 55 in 24 hours.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 21,410 cases of COVID-19.

They include 1,733 in Alexandria, up 30; 1,873 in Arlington, up 69; 806 in the City of Manassas, up 13; 239 in Manassas Park, up nine; and 8,989 in Fairfax County, up 44.

Meanwhile, there are now 282 cases in Fauquier County, up 13; 1,821 in Loudoun County, down 10 from Saturday (without explanation); 4,468 in Prince William County, up 60; 401 in Spotsylvania County, up 15; and 581 in Stafford County, up 12.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 20 to 59

On Wednesday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 1,211, up 22 from Saturday. The age group makes up 22.3%, of the county's total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 96 have been hospitalized and two have died, both of which are unchanged.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 1,060, up 13 from Saturday. The age group makes up 19.5% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 65 have been hospitalized and two have died, both of which are unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the third-highest number of cases with 914, up 16 from Friday. Residents in their 50s make up 16.8% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 119 have been hospitalized and five have died, both of which are unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 948, up 13 from Saturday. Residents in their 20s make up 17.5% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 31 have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 340, up 13 from Saturday. The group makes up 6.3% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county's children -- those ages 9 and younger -- accounted for 162 cases, up four from Saturday. Children under 9 comprise 3% of the county's total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 162 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 494 cases, up two from Saturday. The age group makes up 9.1%, of the county's total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 89 have been hospitalized and 16 have died, both of which are unchanged from Saturday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 169 cases, unchanged from Saturday. They comprise 3.1% of the county's total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 169 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 50 have been hospitalized and 27 have died, both of which are unchanged in the last  24 hours.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Friday, 134 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.5% of the county's cases.

Of the 134 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 45 have been hospitalized and 43 have died, both of which are unchanged.

Saturday, May 23: Prince William loses 4 more residents to COVID-19, bringing the local death toll to 95

The Prince William Health District has lost four more residents to COVID-19, bringing the local death toll due to the disease to 95, according to Saturday's report from the Virginia Department of Health.

The new fatalities include one woman and three men: one in their 60s, two in their 70s and one age 80 or older, according to VDH data.

Because of privacy laws, the state releases only limited information about COVID-19 victims, such as gender, age range (within 10 years) and place of residence.

Residents lost in the Prince William Health District, which includes the county and the cities of Manassas and Manassas Park, include 84 in the county, seven in the City of Manassas and four in Manassas Park.

In terms of age and gender, total local fatalities include those of 50 women and 45 men. Forty-five were 80 or older; 27 were in their 70s; 16 were in their 60s; five were in their 50s; two were in their 40s and two were in their 30s.

Statewide, Virginia added 799 new cases of COVID-19 in the past 24 hours, down from 813 new cases the previous day. Virginia's percent-positivity rate -- positive cases relative to tests -- dipped slightly to 14.6% from Friday's 14.7%.

The Prince William Health District continues to have the highest percent-positivity rate in the state at 26%, but that was also down from 27.6% on Friday.

Prince William Health District's percent-positivity rate Saturday, May 23

The Prince William Health District continued to have the highest percent-positivity rate in the state on Saturday, May 23, at 26%. But that was down slightly from Friday's rate of 27.6%.

The local health district added 123 new COVID-19 cases and five hospitalizations in addition to four new deaths. The additions bring the local health district's COVID-19 tallies to 5,430 cases, 501 hospitalizations and 95 deaths.

Across Virginia, the COVID-19 totals rose to 35,749 cases, up 799; 4,181 hospitalizations, up 36; and 1,159 deaths, an increase of 23 deaths in the past 24 hours. 

Local tests: Saturday's VDH report shows the county health district administered more than 1,000 tests on two days last week. On Tuesday, May 19, 1,178 tests were administered in the health district. On Wednesday, May 20, the health district administered 1,099 tests. (Daily test totals can change as more are processed and reported.)

As of Saturday, a total of 19,132 tests have been reported from the Prince William Health District with a percent-positive rate 26%.

The percent-positivity rate fluctuates daily depending on the number of tests administered and the positive results. 

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of five key measures Gov. Ralph Northam's administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia's three reopening phases. Northam has said the state needs to see a 14-day downward trajectory in the percent-positivity rate before moving into phase one, which most of Virginia did on Friday, May 15.

Northern Virginia cases, deaths: COVID-19 is blamed for 627 deaths, up 114 from Thursday. They include 38 in Alexandria, up one; 95 in Arlington, up four; 326 in Fairfax County, up five; three in Fairfax City, down one (without explanation); five in Falls Church, unchanged; five in Fauquier County, unchanged; 52 in Loudoun County, up one; seven in the City of Manassas, unchanged; four in Manassas Park, unchanged; 84 in Prince William County, up four; four in Stafford County, unchanged; and four in Spotsylvania County, unchanged.

Hospitalizations: According to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association, there were 1,385 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across the state on Saturday, down 75 from Friday, with 330 in intensive care units, down 36, and 213 on ventilators, up six.

Also, 5,047 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Saturday, May 23, up 84 in 24 hours.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 21,149 cases of COVID-19.

They include 1,703 in Alexandria, up 76; 1,804 in Arlington, up nine; 792 in the City of Manassas, up 28; 230 in Manassas Park, up two; and 8,945 in Fairfax County, up 211.

Meanwhile, there are now 269 cases in Fauquier County, up two; 1,831 in Loudoun County, up 24; 4,408 in Prince William County, up 93; 386  in Spotsylvania County, up 13; and 569 in Stafford County, up 17.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 20 to 59

On Wednesday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 1,189, up 29 from Friday. The age group makes up 22.2%, of the county's total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 96 have been hospitalized and two have died, both of which are unchanged since Friday.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 1,047, up 25 from Friday. The age group makes up 19.6% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 65 have been hospitalized, up one, and two have died, which is unchanged since Friday.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the third-highest number of cases with 898, up 16 from Friday. Residents in their 50s make up 16.8% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 119 have been hospitalized, up two, and five have died, the latter of which is unchanged since Friday.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 935, up 23 from Friday. Residents in their 20s make up 17.5% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 31 have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged from Friday.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 327, up 10 from Friday. The group makes up 6.1% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county's children -- those ages 9 and younger -- accounted for 158 cases, up seven from Friday. Children under 9 comprise 3% of the county's total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 158 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 492 cases, up eight from Friday. The age group makes up 9.2%, of the county's total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 89 have been hospitalized, up one, and 16 have died, the latter of which is up one from Friday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 169 cases, up one from Friday. They comprise 3.2% of the county's total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 169 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 50 have been hospitalized and 27 have died, up two in the last  24 hours.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Friday, 134 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up two from Friday. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.5% of the county's cases.

Of the 134 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 45 have been hospitalized, up one, and 43 have died, also up one from Friday.

Friday, May 22: Prince William Health District loses 3 more to COVID-19, bringing the local death toll to 91

The Prince William Health District lost three more residents to COVID-19 in the past 24 hours. They were all men and include one in their 70s, one in their 50s and one in their 30s, according to the most recent data released by the Virginia Department of Health.

Because of privacy laws, the state releases only limited information about COVID-19 victims, such as gender, age range (within 10 years) and place of residence. So far, the Prince William Health District has lost 91 residents to COVID-19. They include 80 residents of the county, seven residents of the City of Manassas and four residents of Manassas Park.

In terms of age and gender, local fatalities include those of 49 women and 42 men. Forty-two were in their 80s; 25 were in their 70s; 15 were in their 60s; five were in their 50s; two were in their 40s and two were in their 30s.

Statewide, Virginia added 813 new cases of COVID-19 in the past 24 hours, down from 1,229 during the previous day, which set a new record in daily cases. Virginia's percent-positivity rate -- positive cases relative to tests -- rose from 14.4% to 14.7% on Friday.

The Prince William Health District continues to have the highest percent-positivity rate in the state with 27.6%, up from Thursday's 25.9%.

May 19 Prince William County percent-positivity rate

The Prince William Health District continued to have the highest percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests in the state on Friday, May 22, at 27.6%, that's up from 25.9% in the past 24 hours.

The local health district also added 158 new COVID-19 cases and six hospitalizations in addition to three new deaths. The additions bring the local health district's COVID-19 tallies to 5,307 cases, 496 hospitalizations and 91 deaths.

Across Virginia, the COVID-19 totals rose to 34,950 cases, up 813; 4,145 hospitalizations, up 52; and 1,136 deaths, an increase of 37 deaths in the past 24 hours. That's the fourth-highest daily death toll since the pandemic began. The state's deadliest day was Sunday, May 3, when Virginia lost 44 residents to COVID-19.

Local tests: Friday's VDH report shows the county health district set a new record in daily tests on Tuesday, May 19, when 1,170 tests were administered locally, according to the most recent tally. (Daily test totals can change as more are processed and reported.)

The percent-positivity rate fluctuates daily depending on the number of tests administered and the positive results. Prince William County saw several large-scale, free COVID-19 testing events this week, which should have shifted the percent-positivity rate downward. Those tests have just begun to be included in the VDH report.

As stated, however, the county health district's percent-positivity rate rose on Friday to 27.6% despite the additional testing. So far, a total of 18,197 tests have been reported from the Prince William Health District.

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The Percent-positivity rate is one of five key measures Gov. Ralph Northam's administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia's three reopening phases. Northam has said the state needs to see a 14-day downward trajectory in the percent-positivity rate before moving into Phase One, which most of Virginia did on Friday, May 15.

Northern Virginia cases, deaths: COVID-19 is blamed for 513 deaths, up 20 from Thursday. They include 37 in Alexandria, unchanged; 91 in Arlington, up two; 321 in Fairfax County, up 12; four in Fairfax City, up one; five in Falls Church, unchanged; five in Fauquier County, unchanged; 51 in Loudoun County, up two; seven in the City of Manassas, up one; four in Manassas Park, up one; 80 in Prince William County, up one; four in Stafford County, unchanged; and four in Spotsylvania County, unchanged.

Hospitalizations: According to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association, there were 1,459 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across the state on Friday, down 32 from Thursday, with 366 in intensive care units, up 15, and 207 on ventilators, up 16. Also, 4,963 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Friday, May 22, up 185 in 24 hours.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 20,589 cases of COVID-19.

They include 1,657 in Alexandria, up 30; 1,795 in Arlington, up 32; 764 in the City of Manassas, up 21; 228 in Manassas Park, up five; and 8,734 in Fairfax County, up 154.

Meanwhile, there are now 267 cases in Fauquier County, up six; 1,807 in Loudoun County, up 107; 4,315 in Prince William County, up 132; 373 in Spotsylvania County, up seven; and 552 in Stafford County, up 12.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 20 to 59

On Wednesday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 1,160, up 42 from Wednesday. The age group makes up 22.2%, of the county's total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 96 have been hospitalized, up two, and two have died, the latter of which is unchanged.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 1,022, up 26 from Thursday. The age group makes up 19.5% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 64 have been hospitalized, up one, and two have died, up one in the past 24 hours.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the third-highest number of cases with 882, up 16 from Thursday. Residents in their 50s make up 16.9% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 117 have been hospitalized, up two, and five have died, up one in the past 24 hours.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 912, up 32 from Thursday. Residents in their 20s make up 17.4% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 31 have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged from Thursday.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 317, up nine from Thursday. The group makes up 6.1% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county's children -- those ages 9 and younger -- accounted for 151 cases, up nine from Thursday. Children under 9 comprise 2.9% of the county's total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 151 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 484 cases, up 17 from Tuesday. The age group makes up 9.3%, of the county's total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 88 have been hospitalized and 15 have died, both of which are unchanged from Thursday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 168 cases, up one from Thursday. They comprise 3.2% of the county's total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 168 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 50 have been hospitalized and 25 have died, the latter of which is up one in 24 hours.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Friday, 132 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up three from Wednesday. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.5% of the county's cases.

Of the 132 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 44 have been hospitalized and 42 have died, both which are unchanged from Thursday.

Thursday, May 21: As testing ramps up, Virginia's daily COVID-19 case count sets new record 

As testing ramps up around the state, Virginia set a new record Thursday in the number of new COVID-19 cases reported in a 24-hour period: 1,229. But the percent of positive COVID-19 tests ticked down slightly, from 14.5% to 14.4%.

Prince William Health District, meanwhile, continues to report the highest percent-positivity rate in Virginia at 25.9%. But that's also on the decline from Wednesday's 27.3%.

One bit of good news locally is that no additional deaths were reported in the Prince William Health District, where the COVID-19 death toll stands at 88, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Virginia on Thursday reported 25 new deaths attributed to COVID-19, bringing the state's death toll to 1,099.

There were 189 new COVID-19 cases in the Prince William Health District, which includes the county and the cities of Manassas and Manassas Park. Prince William County reported 129 new cases, while the city of Manassas reported 44 cases and the city of Manassas Park reported 16.

In the Prince William Health District, the additions bring the cumulative COVID-19 numbers to 5,149 cases, 491 hospitalizations and 88 deaths.

Local deaths: The Prince William Health District has so far lost 49 women and 39 men to COVID-19. Fatalities include: 42 residents aged 80 or older; 24 in their 70s; 15 in their 60s; four in their 50s; two in their 40s; and one in their 30s.

Local tests: Thursday's VDH report shows the county health district set a new record in daily tests on Tuesday, May 19, when 879 tests were administered locally.

So far, a total of 17,479 tests have been reported from the Prince William Health District. As stated, the local district's percent-positivity rate ranks first in the state at 25.9%.

The percent-positivity rate changes daily depending on the number of tests administered and the positive results. Prince William County is conducting several large-scale, free COVID-19 testing events this week, which should shift the percent-positivity rate downward. Those tests have just begun to be included in the VDH report.

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The Percent-positivity rate is one of five key measures Gov. Ralph Northam's administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia's three reopening phases. Northam has said the state needs to see a 14-day downward trajectory in the percent-positivity rate before moving into Phase One, which most of Virginia did on Friday, May 15.

Northern Virginia cases, deaths: COVID-19 is blamed for 593 deaths. They include 309 in Fairfax, up four; three in Fairfax City, unchanged; five in Falls Church, unchanged; 89 in Arlington, up eight; and 79 in Prince William, unchanged.

There have been six deaths in the City of Manassas and three in Manassas Park, both of which are unchanged. Loudoun County has so far had 49 deaths; Fauquier County, five; Stafford County, four; and Spotsylvania County, four. All are unchanged from Wednesday's report.

Hospitalizations: The Prince William Health District reported 491 total hospitalizations due to COVID-19, up 29 in the past 24 hours. 

The local health district is reporting the second-highest number of hospitalizations in the state. Fairfax County continues to report the highest number of hospitalizations in Virginia with 1,165, up 32 from Wednesday's report.

According to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association, there were 1,491 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across the state on Thursday, down 45 from Wednesday, with 351 in intensive care units, down 19, and 191 on ventilators, down 11. Also, 4,778 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Thursday, May 21, up 252 in 24 hours.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 20,190 cases of COVID-19.

They include 1,627 in Alexandria, up 50; 1,763 in Arlington, up 35; 743 in the City of Manassas, up 44; 223 in Manassas Park, up 16; and 8,580 in Fairfax County, up 417. The last is by far the largest one-day jump in Fairfax County since the pandemic began. (Fairfax County set its last one-day record May 11 with 308 new cases.)

Meanwhile, there are now 261 cases in Fauquier County, up 10; 1,700 in Loudoun County, up 121; 4,183 in Prince William County, up 129; 366 in Spotsylvania County, up 15; and 540 in Stafford County, up 26.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 20 to 59

On Wednesday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 1,118, up 39 from Wednesday. The age group makes up 22%, of the county's total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 94 have been hospitalized, up four, and two have died, the latter of which is unchanged.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 996, up 37 from Wednesday. The age group makes up 19.6% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 63 have been hospitalized, up six, and one has died, the latter of which is unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the third-highest number of cases with 866, up 24 from Wednesday. Residents in their 50s make up 17.1% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 115 have been hospitalized, up five, and four have died, the latter of which is unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 880, up 31 from Tuesday. Residents in their 20s make up 17.4% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 31 have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged from Wednesday.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 308, up eight from Tuesday. The group makes up 6.1% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county's children -- those ages 9 and younger -- accounted for 142 cases, up four from Wednesday. Children under 9 comprise 2.8% of the county's total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 142 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 467 cases, up 18 from Tuesday. The age group makes up 9.2%, of the county's total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 88 have been hospitalized, up 12, and 15 have died, the latter of which is unchanged from Wednesday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 167 cases, up four from Wednesday. They comprise 3.3% of the county's total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 167 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 50 have been hospitalized, up one, and 24 have died, which is unchanged since Wednesday.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Tuesday, 129 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up two from Wednesday. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.5% of the county's cases.

Of the 129 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 44 have been hospitalized, up one, and 42 have died, which is unchanged from Wednesday.

Wednesday, May 21: Prince William reports 144 new COVID-19 cases, 7 additional deaths

Virginia reported 763 new cases of COVID-19 and 33 new deaths attributed to the disease on Wednesday. That includes 144 new COVID-19 cases and seven new deaths in the Prince William Health District.

Meanwhile, the Prince William Health District continues to have the highest percent-positivity rate in Virginia at 27.3%, down slightly from 27.6% in the past 24 hours, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

The state's overall percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests ticked down slightly to 14.5% on Wednesday.

May 19 Prince William County percent-positivity rate

The Prince William Health District continued to have the highest percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests in the state on Friday, May 22, at 27.6%, that's up from 25.9% in the past 24 hours.

The new numbers bring the state's total number of COVID-19 cases to 32,908; hospitalizations to 3,979; and deaths to 1,074.

In the local health district, which includes the county and the cities of Manassas and Manassas Park, the new numbers bring the cumulative COVID-19 numbers to 4,960 cases, 436 hospitalizations and 88 deaths.

Local deaths: The Prince William Health District has so far lost 49 women and 39 men to COVID-19. That's an increase of four women and three men from Tuesday's report. The new deaths include those of five residents age 80 or older, one resident in their 70s and one resident in their 60s.

Since the pandemic began, the Prince William Health District has lost to COVID-19: 42 residents aged 80 or older; 24 in their 70s; and 15 in their 60s.

The county health district has also lost four residents in their 50s; two in their 40s; and one in their 30s.

Local tests, percent-positivity rate: The local health district's percent-positivity rate, at 27.3%, remained the highest of any health district in the state on Wednesday.

The number changes daily depending on the number of tests administered and the positive results. Prince William County is conducting several large-scale, free COVID-19 testing events this week, which should shift the percent-positivity rate downward. But those tests have just begun to be included in the VDH report.

The county health district reported a new daily high in local tests: 736 were reported on Sunday, May 17, up from the previous record of 690 on Wednesday, May 13.

So far, a total of 16,601 tests have been reported from the Prince William Health District. The local district ranks second in the state in the overall number of tests administered, behind only Fairfax County, which has so far reported 30,135 tests.

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

Percent-positivity is one of five key measures Gov. Ralph Northam's administration is watching  to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia's three reopening phases.

Northam has said the state needs to see a 14-day downward trajectory in the percent-positivity rate before moving into phase 1, which most of Virginia did on Friday, May 15.

Across Virginia, the percent-positivity rate dipped to 14.5% Wednesday, down .4% from Tuesday's 14.9%. 

Northern Virginia cases, deaths: COVID-19 is blamed for 575 deaths. They include 305 in Fairfax, up 13; three in Fairfax City, unchanged; five in Falls Church, up one; 81 in Arlington, up two; and 79 in Prince William, up six.

There have been six deaths in the City of Manassas, up one; three in Manassas Park, unchanged; 49 in Loudoun County, up one; five in Fauquier County, unchanged; four in Stafford County and four in Spotsylvania County, both of which were unchanged.

Hospitalizations: The Prince William Health District reported 462 total hospitalizations due to COVID-19, up 14 in the past 24 hours. 

The local health district is reporting the second-highest number of hospitalizations in the state. Fairfax County continues to report the highest number of hospitalizations in Virginia with 1,133, up 20 from Tuesday's report.

According to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association, there were 1,536 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across the state on Wedneday, up 39 from Tuesday, with 370 in intensive care units, down seven, and 202 on ventilators, up three. Also, 4,523 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Wednesday, May 20, up 252 in 24 hours.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 19,214 cases of COVID-19.

They include 1,577 in Alexandria, up 33; 1,728 in Arlington, up 40; 699 in the City of Manassas, up 19; 207 in Manassas Park, up five; 8,163 in Fairfax County, up 143; 251 in Fauquier County, up eight; 1,579 in Loudoun County, up 52; 4,054 in Prince William County, up 120; 351 in Spotsylvania County, up 12; and 514 in Stafford County, up 13.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 30 to 59

On Wednesday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 1,079, up 30 from Tuesday. The age group makes up 22%, of the county's total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 90 have been hospitalized, up three, and two have died, the latter of which is unchanged.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 959, up 27 from Tuesday. The age group makes up 19.5% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 57 have been hospitalized, up two, and one has died, the latter of which is unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the third-highest number of cases with 842, up 20 from Tuesday. Residents in their 50s make up 17.2% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 110 have been hospitalized, up four, and four have died, the latter of which is unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 849, up 34 from Tuesday. Residents in their 20s make up 17.3% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 31 have been hospitalized, up one, and none have died, the latter of which is unchanged.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 300, up 14 from Tuesday. The group makes up 6.1% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county's children -- those ages 9 and younger -- accounted for 138 cases, up eight from Monday. Children under 9 comprise 2.8% of the county's total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 138 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 449 cases, up four from Tuesday. The age group makes up 9.2%, of the county's total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 76 have been hospitalized and 15 have died, the latter of which is up one from Tuesday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 163 cases, up four from Tuesday. They comprise 3.3% of the county's total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 163 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 49 have been hospitalized, up two, and 24 have died, up one since Tuesday.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Tuesday, 127 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up three from Tuesday. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.6% of the county's cases.

Of the 127 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 43 have been hospitalized, up three, and 42 have died, up two from Monday.

Tuesday, May 19: Virginia adds 1,005 COVID-19 cases, 27 deaths

Virginia reported 1,005 new cases of COVID-19 and 27 new deaths on Tuesday, including 231 new cases and three new deaths in the Prince William Health District. The local percent-positivity rate remains the highest in the state at 27.6%.

New daily cases in the local health district marked a more than 60% increase from the 138 new cases reported on Monday. The county's percent of positive tests ticked down slightly, from 27.9% to 27.6%, but the local health district's rate still leads the state, according to the latest Virginia Department of Health report.

The new numbers bring the state's total number of COVID-19 cases to 32,145; hospitalizations to 3,904; and deaths to 1,041.

In the local health district, the new numbers bring the cumulative COVID-19 numbers to 4,816 cases, 448 hospitalizations and 81 deaths, which includes those of 45 women, up two, and 36 men, up one from Monday's report. The new deaths include those of two residents age 80 or older and one resident in their 60s.

The Prince William Health District, which includes the cities of Manassas and Manassas Park, has so far lost to COVID-19: 37 residents aged 80 or older; 23 in their 70s; 14 in their 60s; four in their 50s; two in their 40s; and one in their 30s. The county reported no new deaths on Monday, May 17.

Regarding the county's percent-positivity rate, the number changes daily depending on the number of tests administered and the positive results. Prince William County is conducting several large-scale, free COVID-19 testing events this week, which should shift the percent-positivity rate downward. But those tests have not yet been included in the VDH report.

The county health district reported 536 tests administered Sunday, 603 on Saturday and 547 on Friday. The highest number of tests ever administered in one day in the Prince William Health District occurred on Wednesday, May 13, when the county reported 685 tests.

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

Percent-positivity is one of five key measures Gov. Ralph Northam's administration is watching  to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia's three reopening phases.

Northam has said the state needs to see a 14-day downward trajectory in the percent-positivity rate before moving into phase 1, which most of Virginia did on Friday. 

Across Virginia, the percent-positivity rate held steady Tuesday at 14.9%, unchanged from Monday.

Across Northern Virginia, COVID-19 is blamed for 554 deaths. They include 292 in Fairfax, up eight; three in Fairfax City, unchanged; four in Falls Church, unchanged; 79 in Arlington, up two; and 73 in Prince William, up three.

There have been five deaths in the City of Manassas, three in Manassas Park, 48 in Loudoun County, five in Fauquier County, four in Stafford County and four in Spotsylvania -- all unchanged.

Hospitalizations: The Prince William Health District reported 448 total hospitalizations due to COVID-19, up 21 in the past 24 hours.

The local health district is reporting the second-highest number of hospitalizations in the state. Fairfax County continues to report the highest number of hospitalizations in Virginia with 1,113, up 13 from Monday's report.

According to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association, there were 1,497 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across the state on Tuesday, down five from Monday, with 377 in intensive care units, up 16, and 199 on ventilators, up five. Also, 4,271 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Tuesday, May 19, up 164 in 24 hours.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 18,870 cases of COVID-19.

They include 1,544 in Alexandria, up 34; 1,688 in Arlington, up 50; 680 in the City of Manassas, up 52; 202 in Manassas Park, up four; 8,020 in Fairfax County, up 177; 243 in Fauquier County, up 20; 1,527 in Loudoun County, up 41; 3,934 in Prince William County, up 175; 339 in Spotsylvania County, up 20; and 501 in Stafford County, up 17.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 30 to 59

On Wednesday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 1,049, up 43 from Sunday. The age group makes up 22%, of the county's total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 87 have been hospitalized, up three, and two have died, the latter of which is unchanged.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 932, up 44 from Monday. The age group makes up 19.6% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 55 have been hospitalized, up three, and one has died, the latter of which is unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the third-highest number of cases with 822, up 32 from Monday. Residents in their 50s make up 17.3% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 106 have been hospitalized, up three, and four have died, the latter of which is unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 815, up 45 from Monday. Residents in their 20s make up 17.1% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 30 have been hospitalized, up one, and none have died, the latter of which is unchanged.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 286, up 26 from Monday. The group makes up 6% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county's children -- those ages 9 and younger -- accounted for 130 cases, up 14 from Monday. Children under 9 comprise 2.7% of the county's total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 130 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, three have been hospitalized, up one, and none have died, the latter of which is unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 445 cases, up 16 from Monday. The age group makes up 9.3%, of the county's total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 76 have been hospitalized, up seven, and 14 have died, up one from Monday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 159 cases, up four from Sunday. They comprise 3.4% of the county's total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 159 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 47 have been hospitalized and 23 have died, both of which are unchanged.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Tuesday, 124 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, unchanged from Monday. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.6% of the county's cases.

Of the 124 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 40 have been hospitalized, up two, and 37 have died, up two from Monday.

Monday, May 18: COVID-19 deaths fall, but Prince William reports the state's highest percent-positivity rate

For the first time in three weeks, the Prince William Health District reported no new daily deaths due to COVID-19.

The bad news? New cases in the local health district ticked up to 138 and the county now leads the state in the percent of tests with a positive result at 27.9%, according to the latest Virginia Department of Health report.

Statewide, Virginia added 752 new COVID-19 cases and five additional deaths on Monday, May 18. But no new deaths were reported in the Prince William County, Manassas or Manassas Park. 

In the local health district, deaths blamed on COVID-19 remained steady Monday at 78, which includes those of 43 women and 35 men.

The health district has so far lost 35 residents ages 80 or older; 23 in their 70s; 13 in their 60s; four in their 50s; two in their 40s; and one in their 30s. 

Monday marked the first time in three weeks -- since Monday, April 27 -- that the county health district has reported no new daily deaths due to COVID-19. 

Statewide, it's the first time since Tuesday, April 14, that the daily death toll dropped to five. There were seven new deaths reported across Virginia on Sunday and 25 on Saturday, according to the VDH.

The new numbers bring the state's total number of COVID-19 cases to 31,140; hospitalizations to 3,882; and deaths to 1,014, according to the latest VDH report.

The Prince William Health District, meanwhile, added 138 new cases and 11 additional hospitalizations. The cases include 93 in the county, 34 in the City of Manassas and 11 in Manassas Park.

The new additions bring the local COVID-19 totals to 4,585 cases and 427 hospitalizations.

Regarding the percent-positivity rate, Prince William's rate of 27.9% ranked first in the state on Monday, up from 26.6% on Saturday. Arlington had the second-highest rate Monday with 26.2%.

The rates change daily depending on the number of tests administered and the positive results.

The county health district reported 546 tests administered on Friday and 592 on Saturday. The most tests ever administered in one day in the Prince William Health District occurred on Wednesday, May 13, when the county reported 661 tests.

Efforts are under way this week to offer more tests to county residents.

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

Percent-positivity is one of five key measures Gov. Ralph Northam's administration is watching  to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia's three reopening phases.

Northam has said the state needs to see a 14-day downward trajectory in the percent-positivity rate before moving into phase 1, which most of Virginia did on Friday. 

Across Virginia, the percent-positivity rate dropped slightly on Monday to 14.9%.

Across Northern Virginia, COVID-19 is blamed for 541 deaths. They include 284 in Fairfax, up two; three in Fairfax City, unchanged; four in Falls Church, unchanged; 77 in Arlington, up two; and 70 in Prince William, unchanged.

There have been five deaths in the City of Manassas, three in Manassas Park, 48 in Loudoun County, five in Fauquier County, four in Stafford County and four in Spotsylvania -- all unchanged.

Hospitalizations: The Prince William Health District reported 427 total hospitalizations due to COVID-19, up 10 in the past 24 hours.

The local health district is reporting the second-highest number of hospitalizations in the state. Fairfax County continues to report the highest number of hospitalizations in Virginia with 1,100, up 16 from Sunday's report.

According to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association, there were 1,502 people hospitalized with COVID-19 across the state on Monday with 361 in intensive care units and 194 on ventilators. Also, 4,107 people who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 had been discharged as of Monday, May 18.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 18,179 cases of COVID-19.

They include 1,510 in Alexandria, up 34; 1,638 in Arlington, up 48; 628 in the City of Manassas, up 34; 198 in Manassas Park, up 11; 7,843 in Fairfax County, up 200; 223 in Fauquier County, up 10; 1,486 in Loudoun County, up 40; 3,759 in Prince William County, up 93; 319 in Spotsylvania County, up seven; and 484 in Stafford County, up 17.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 30 to 59

On Wednesday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 1,006, up 38 from Sunday. The age group makes up 22.2%, of the county's total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 84 have been hospitalized, up two, and two have died, which is unchanged.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 888, up 28 from Sunday. The age group makes up 19.6% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 52 have been hospitalized, up one, and one has died, which is unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the third-highest number of cases with 790, up 20 from Sunday. Residents in their 50s make up 17.4% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 103 have been hospitalized, up two, and four have died, the latter of which is unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 770, up 20 from Sunday. Residents in their 20s make up 17% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 29 have been hospitalized, up two, and none have died, which is unchanged.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 260, up 10 from Sunday. The group makes up 5.7% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county's children -- those ages 9 and younger -- accounted for 116 cases, up four from Sunday. Children under 9 comprise 2.6% of the county's total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 116 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, two have been hospitalized and none have died, which is also unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 429 cases, up nine from Sunday. The age group makes up 9.5%, of the county's total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 69 have been hospitalized, up two, and 13 have died, which is unchanged. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 159 cases, up seven from Monday. They comprise 3.3% of the county's total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 159 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 48 have been hospitalized, up one, and 23 have died, the latter of which is unchanged.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Saturday, 124 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up three from Monday. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.6% of the county's cases.

Of the 124 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 40 have been hospitalized, up two, and 37 have died, also up two.

Sunday, May 17: Virginia's COVID-19 cases top 30,000; Prince William reports 127 new cases, 1 new death

Virginia's COVID-19 cases topped 30,000 Sunday, but the number of new cases added in the past 24 hours dropped to 705, which is the lowest number of new cases reported in a 24-hour period in 10 days.

The state added seven new deaths, which is the lowest number of daily deaths reported since April 14 and less than one-third of the 25 deaths reported Saturday.

The new numbers bring the state's total number of COVID-19 cases to 30,388, hospitalizations to 3,775 and deaths to 1,009, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

The Prince William Health District, meanwhile, added 127 new cases, 12 additional hospitalizations and one additional death, that of a woman in her 70s.

The cases include 103 in the county, 20 in the City of Manassas and four in Manassas Park, according to the VDH report.

The new additions bring the local COVID-19 totals to 4,447 cases, 417 hospitalizations and 78 deaths.

The Prince William Health District also continues to report one of the highest percent-positivity rates on COVID-19 tests in Virginia. The county's rate dropped to 26.6% on Sunday, behind only Arlington County, which saw its rate rise to 34.2%.

There was no number available for the Eastern Shore, however, which ranked second in the state two days ago with 29%.

The rates change daily depending on the number of tests administered and the positive results. The county reported 567 tests administered Friday and 80 administered on Saturday. Overall, 14,720 tests have been given in the Prince William Health District, which is the second-highest in the state, behind only Fairfax County.

The World Health Organization recommends a percent-positivity rate of 10%, which the organization says is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

Percent-positivity is one of five key measures Gov. Ralph Northam's administration is watching  to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia's three reopening phases.

Northam has said the state needs to see a 14-day downward trajectory in the percent-positivity rate before moving into phase one, which most of Virginia did on Friday. 

Across Virginia, the percent-positivity rate dropped slightly on Sunday to 14.5%.

Local deaths: Local deaths now number 78, which include those of 43 women, up one, and 35 men, which is unchanged since Saturday. 

As of Sunday, the health district had lost 35 residents ages 80 or older; 23 in their 70s, up one; and 13 in their 60s, unchanged.

Meanwhile, there have been four deaths among residents in their 50s; two in their 40s; and one in their 30s, all unchanged over the last several days.

Across Northern Virginia, COVID-19 is blamed for 537 deaths. They include 282 in Fairfax, up four; three in Fairfax City, unchanged; four in Falls Church, unchanged; 75 in Arlington, up one; and 70 in Prince William, up one.

There have been five deaths in the City of Manassas, three in Manassas Park, 48 in Loudoun County, five in Fauquier County, four in Stafford County and four in Spotsylvania -- all unchanged.

Hospitalizations: The Prince William Health District reported 417 total hospitalizations due to COVID-19, up 12 in the past 24 hours.

The local health district is reporting the second-highest number of hospitalizations in the state. Fairfax County continues to report the highest number of hospitalizations in Virginia with 1,084, up 23 from Saturday's report.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 17,778 cases of COVID-19.

They include 1,476 in Alexandria, up seven; 1,590 in Arlington, up 30; 594 in the City of Manassas, up 20; 187 in Manassas Park, up three; 7,643 in Fairfax County, up 257; 213 in Fauquier County, up two; 1,446 in Loudoun County, up 16; 3,666 in Prince William County, up 103; 312 in Spotsylvania County, up eight; and 467 in Stafford County, up nine.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 30 to 59

On Wednesday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 968, up 27 from Saturday. The age group makes up 22%, of the county's total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 82 have been hospitalized, up three, and two have died, which is unchanged.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 860, up 30 from Saturday. The age group makes up 19.6% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 51 have been hospitalized, up two, and one has died, which is unchanged from Saturday.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the third-highest number of cases with 770, up 19 from Saturday. Residents in their 50s make up 17.5% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 101 have been hospitalized, up three, and four have died, the latter of which is unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 750, up 23 from Saturday. Residents in their 20s make up 17.1% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 27 have been hospitalized, and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 250, up 12 from Saturday. The group makes up 5.7% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county's children -- those ages 9 and younger -- accounted for 112 cases, up two from Saturday. Children under 9 comprise 2.5% of the county's total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 112 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, two have been hospitalized and none have died, which is also unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 420 cases, up six from Saturday. The age group makes up 9.6%, of the county's total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 67 have been hospitalized, up two, and 13 have died, unchanged from Friday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 148 cases, down two from Saturday (without explanation from the VDH). They comprise 3.4% of the county's total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 148 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 47 have been hospitalized and 23 have died, the latter of which is up one from Saturday.

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Saturday, 117 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up three from Saturday. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.7% of the county's cases.

Of the 117 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 37 have been hospitalized and 35 have died, unchanged from Saturday.

Saturday, May 16: Virginia's COVID-19 death toll tops 1,000; Prince William adds 190 cases, 2 deaths

Virginia's COVID-19 death toll surpassed 1,000 for the first time Saturday. Meanwhile 1,011 new COVID-19 cases were reported across the state, including 190 in the Prince William Health District.

Virginia also reported 67 more hospitalizations and 25 additional deaths in 24 hours, bringing the state's COVID-19 tallies to 29,683 cases, 3,724 hospitalizations and 1,002 deaths.

The Prince William Health District, which includes Prince William County, Manassas and Manassas Park, reported 190 new cases, including 142 in the county, 41 in the City of Manassas and seven in Manassas Park. The county also added seven more hospitalizations and two deaths.

The new numbers bring the local COVID-19 totals to 4,320 cases, 405 hospitalizations and 77 deaths.

The Prince William Health District continues to report one of the highest percent-positivity rates on COVID-19 tests in Virginia. 

The county's rate inched up to 28.6% Saturday, which is the second-highest in the state behind the Eastern Shore, which reported a percent-positivity rate of 29.2%.

Both are well above the World Health Organization's recommended 10% positivity rate, which is an indicator that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

Percent-positivity is one of five key measures Gov. Ralph Northam's administration is watching  to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia's three reopening phases.

Northam has said the state needs to see a 14-day downward trajectory in the percent-positivity rate before moving into phase one, which most of Virginia did on Friday. Only Northern Virginia, Richmond and Accomack County remain in "phase zero." Northern Virginia is hoped to transition to phase one on Friday, May 29.

Across Virginia, the percent-positivity rate held steady Saturday at 15.1%.

Local deaths: Local deaths now number 77, which include those of 42 women, up one, and 35 men, also up one in the past 24 hours. 

As of Saturday, the health district had lost 35 residents ages 80 or older, up two; 22 in their 70s; and 13 in their 60s, both unchanged.

Meanwhile, there have been four deaths among residents in their 50s; two in their 40s; and one in their 30s, all unchanged over the last several days.

Northern Virginia deaths: Fairfax County Health District continues to lead the state in COVID-19 deaths with 278, up 11 from Friday's report. 

Across Northern Virginia, COVID-19 is blamed for 518 deaths, including 278 in Fairfax, up 11; three in Fairfax City, unchanged; four in Falls Church, unchanged; 74 in Arlington, up three; 69 in Prince William, up two.

There were five deaths in the City of Manassas, three in Manassas Park, 48 in Loudoun County, five in Fauquier County, four in Stafford County and four in Spotsylvania -- all unchanged.

Northern Virginia hospitalizations: The Prince William Health District reported 405 total hospitalizations and seven new admissions in the past 24 hours, due to COVID-19.

The local health district is reporting the second-highest number of hospitalizations in the state. Fairfax County continues to report the highest number of hospitalizations in Virginia with 1,061, up 26 from Friday's report.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 17,307 cases of COVID-19.

They include 1,469 in Alexandria, up 64; 1,560 in Arlington, up 26; 574 in the City of Manassas, up 41; 183 in Manassas Park, up seven; 7,386 in Fairfax County, up 227; 211 in Fauquier County, up six; 1,430 in Loudoun County, up 56; 3,563 in Prince William County, up 142; 304 in Spotsylvania County, up 13; and 458 in Stafford County, up 16.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 30 to 59

On Wednesday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 941, up 37 from Friday. The age group makes up 22%, of the county's total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 79 have been hospitalized, up one, and two have died, which is unchanged.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 830, up 40 from Friday. The age group makes up 19.4% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 49 have been hospitalized, up two, and one has died, which is unchanged from Thursday.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the third-highest number of cases with 751, up 23 from Friday. Residents in their 50s make up 17.6% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 98 have been hospitalized, up two, and four have died, the latter of which is unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 727, up 32 from Thursday. Residents in their 20s make up 17% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 27 have been hospitalized, up two, but none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 238, up 19 from Friday. The group makes up 5.6% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county's children -- those ages 9 and younger -- accounted for 110 cases, up four from Friday. Children under 9 comprise 2.6% of the county's total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 106 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, two have been hospitalized and none have died, which is also unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 414 cases, up 23 from Friday. The age group makes up 9.7%, of the county's total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 65 have been hospitalized, up one, and 13 have died, unchanged from Friday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 150 cases, up one from Friday. They comprise 3.5% of the county's total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 150 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 47 have been hospitalized, up two, and 22 have died, which is unchanged from Friday. 

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Saturday, 114 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up five from Friday. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.7% of the county's cases.

Of the 114 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 35 have been hospitalized and 35 have died, up two from Friday.

Friday, May 15: Prince William adds 94 COVID-19 cases, ranks 3rd in the state in positive tests

New COVID-19 cases reported both statewide and locally dipped on Friday, but new testing data released for the first time shows the Prince William Health District with the third-highest percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests in Virginia.

In the Prince William Health District, which includes the county, Manassas and Manassas Park, the percent of positive COVID-19 tests to overall tests stood at 28.2% on Friday.

That's behind only two Virginia jurisdictions. Alexandria topped the state with a percent-positivity rate of 30.2%; while the Eastern Shore came in second with a percent-positivity rate of 29%, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Percent-positivity refers to the percent of overall tests that return with a positive result. The measure is one of five Gov. Ralph Northam's administration is watching as "key measures" in deciding when the state is ready to move  toward the first of Virginia's three reopening phases.

Northam has said the state needs to see a 14-day downward trajectory in the percent-positivity rate before moving into phase one, which most of the state -- with the exception of Northern Virginia, the City of Richmond and Accomack County -- did today, Friday, May 15.

Across Virginia, the percent-positivity rate stood at 15% on Friday, a slight uptick from the 14% reported Thursday.

The uptick could be at least partly the result of Northam's decision, announced Thursday, to separate serological tests from the diagnostic tests reported daily on the VDH coronavirus website.

That move came after news organizations reported that the state's previous practice of combining the tests appeared to be an effort to boost Virginia's testing statistics, which have lagged nationally.

The percent-positivity rate usually declines as more tests are performed. The Prince William Health District, however, is reporting the second-highest number of tests administered in the state with 13,593 on Friday. That's behind only Fairfax County, which leads the state in testing with 25,300 tests administered.

Four health districts in Northern Virginia ranked in the top 10 in the state in percent-positivity of COVID-19 tests.

Those health districts include Fairfax, which ranked fourth with a percent-positivity rate of 26.4%; Arlington, which came in fifth with a percent-positivity rate of 25.8%; Loudoun, which tied with Richmond for sixth place with a percent-positivity rate of 21.9%; and Rappahannock-Rapidan, which came in seventh place with a percent-positivity rate of 21.1%.

The Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District includes Fauquier, Culpeper, Madison, Orange and Rappahannock counties.

Cases: Across the state, Virginia added 859 new COVID-19 cases on Friday and an additional 22 deaths. The numbers bring the state's new totals to 28,672 cases, 3,657 hospitalizations and 977 deaths.

The Prince William Health district added 94 new COVID-19 cases, 18 hospitalizations and one death. The numbers bring the local health district's new totals to 4,130 COVID-19 cases, 398 hospitalizations and 75 deaths.

Local deaths: Local deaths now include that of 41 women, unchanged, and 34 men, up one in the past 24 hours. 

As of Friday, the health district had lost 33 residents ages 80 or older, up one; 22 in their 70s; and 13 in their 60s, both unchanged.

Meanwhile, there have been four deaths among residents in their 50s; two in their 40s; and one in their 30s, all unchanged over the last several days.

Virginia's key measures: Among other key measures Virginia officials are watching as pandemic restrictions are eased, daily hospitalizations ticked up from 1,526 to 1,533 on Friday, but the rolling, seven-day average of hospitalizations declined from 1,563.6 on Thursday to 1,552.1 in the past 24 hours. 

According to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association, there area 362 COVID-19 patients in intensive care, up seven, and 195 people are on ventilators, down six.

Also as of Friday, 3,805 COVID-19 patients had been released from the hospital, up 147 from Thursday's report.

Regarding tests, the state reported testing 7,184 people on Wednesday and 2,035 people on Thursday.

Northern Virginia deaths: Fairfax County Health District continues to lead the state in COVID-19 deaths with 267, up six from Thursday's report. 

Across Northern Virginia, COVID-19 is blamed for 507 deaths, including 267 in Fairfax, up five; three in Fairfax City, unchanged; four in Falls Church, unchanged; 71 in Arlington, up one; 67 in Prince William, up one; five in the City of Manassas; three in Manassas Park, unchanged; 48 in Loudoun County, up four; five in Fauquier County, unchanged; four in Stafford County and four in Spotsylvania, both unchanged.

Northern Virginia hospitalizations: The Prince William Health District reported 398 total hospitalizations and 18 new admissions in the past 24 hours, due to COVID-19.

The local health district is reporting the second-highest number of hospitalizations in the state. Fairfax County continues to report the highest number of hospitalizations in Virginia with 1,035, up 16 from Thursday's report.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 16,617 cases of COVID-19.

They include 1,396 in Alexandria, up 47 over the past 24 hours; 1,534 in Arlington, up 35; 533 in the City of Manassas, up 18; 176 in Manassas Park, up six; 7,159 in Fairfax County, up 208; 205 in Fauquier County, up five; 1,374 in Loudoun County, up 35; 3,421 in Prince William County, up 70; 291 in Spotsylvania County, up nine; and 442 in Stafford County, up 16.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 30 to 59

On Wednesday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 904, up 22 from Thursday. The age group makes up 22.1%, of the county's total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 78 have been hospitalized, up four, and two have died, which is unchanged.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 790, up 19 from Thursday. The age group makes up 19.3% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 47 have been hospitalized, up five, and one has died, which is unchanged from Thursday.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the third-highest number of cases with 728, up nine from Thursday. Residents in their 50s make up 18% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 96 have been hospitalized, up one, and four have died, the latter of which is unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 695, up 18 from Thursday. Residents in their 20s make up 17% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 27 have been hospitalized, up two, but none have died, both of which are unchanged.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 219, up six from Thursday. The group makes up 5.4% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county's children -- those ages 9 and younger -- accounted for 106 cases, up seven from Thursday. Children under 9 comprise 2.6% of the county's total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 106 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, two have been hospitalized and none have died, which is also unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 391 cases, up five from Thursday. The age group makes up 9.6%, of the county's total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 65 have been hospitalized, up one, and 13 have died, up one from Thursday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 149 cases, up three from Thursday. They comprise 3.6% of the county's total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 149 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 45 have been hospitalized, up two, and 22 have died, which is unchanged from Thursday. 

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Tuesday, 109 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up two from Thursday. Cases among residents ages 80 and older make up 2.7% of the county's cases.

Of the 109 residents in their 80s who tested positive for COVID-19, 35 have been hospitalized and 33 have died, up one from Thursday.

Thursday, May 14: Virginia adds 1,067 new COVID-19 cases -- a new record -- while Prince William adds 244

Both Virginia and the Prince William Health District saw spikes in new COVID-19 cases Thursday, with 1,067 new cases reported across the state -- a new daily record -- and 244 reported in the county, Manassas and Manassas Park.

Across the state, 28 more people died of COVID-19 in the past 24 hours, including two in the Prince William Health District, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

The new numbers bring the state's overall COVID-19 totals to 27,813 cases, 3,592 hospitalizations and 955 deaths.

In the Prince William Health district, which includes Prince William County, Manassas and Manassas Park, there are now 4,036 cases, 385 hospitalizations and 74 deaths, according to Thursday's VDH report.

Locally, the new COVID-19 cases include 170 new cases in Prince William, 56 in the City of Manassas and 18 in Manassas Park.

Local deaths: The county health district is reporting two additional deaths, one in the county and one in the City of Manassas. Local deaths blamed on COVID-19 now stand at 74, which include 41 women, up one, and 33 men, also up one. 

As of Thursday, the health district had lost 32 residents ages 80 or older, up one; 22 in their 70s, up one; and 13 in their 60s, unchanged.

Meanwhile, there have been four deaths among residents in their 50s; two in their 40s; and one in their 30s, all unchanged over the last several days.

Virginia's key measures: Among key measures Virginia officials are watching as pandemic restrictions are eased, both hospitalizations and the percent of overall tests that were positive remained steady Thursday.

Overall tests administered daily, however, continue to fluctuate, and remain well below the 10,000 goal of daily tests Gov. Ralph Northam set before reopening the state's economy.

Virginia hospitalizations: According to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association, there were 1,533 people currently hospitalized for confirmed and probable cases of COVID-19 across Virginia on Thursday, up seven from Wednesday's total of 1,526. That includes 355 people in intensive care, down nine, and 201 people on ventilators, down one.

Also as of Thursday, 3,678 COVID-19 patients had been released from the hospital, up 124 from Wednesday's report.

The rolling, seven-day average of daily hospitalizations ticked down from 1,563 on Wednesday to 1,552 on Thursday. 

Regarding tests, the rolling, seven-day average of positive cases relative to new tests statewide remained steady at 14% on Thursday, May 14. The state reported testing 4,727 people on Wednesday.

Northern Virginia deaths: Fairfax County Health District continues to lead the state in COVID-19 deaths with 267, up five from Wednesday's report. 

Across Northern Virginia, COVID-19 is blamed for 507 deaths, including 267 in Fairfax, up five; three in Fairfax City, unchanged; four in Falls Church, unchanged; 70 in Arlington, up one; 66 in Prince William, up one; five in the City of Manassas, up one; three in Manassas Park, unchanged; 44 in Loudoun County, up six; five in Fauquier County, unchanged; four in Stafford County and four in Spotsylvania, both unchanged.

Northern Virginia hospitalizations: The Prince William Health District reported 385 total hospitalizations and nine new admissions in the past 24 hours, due to COVID-19.

The local health district is reporting the second-highest number of hospitalizations in the state. Fairfax County continues to report the highest number of hospitalizations in Virginia with 1,019, up 20 from Wednesday's report.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 16,246 cases of COVID-19.

They include 1,349 in Alexandria, up 44 over the past 24 hours; 1,499 in Arlington, up 39; 515 in the City of Manassas, up 56; 170 in Manassas Park, up 18; 6,951 in Fairfax County, up 285; 200 in Fauquier County, up 10; 1,339 in Loudoun County, up 56; 3,351 in Prince William County, up 170; 282 in Spotsylvania County, up 12; and 426 in Stafford County, up 13.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 30 to 59

On Wednesday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 882, up 48 from Wednesday. The age group makes up 22.1%, of the county's total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 74 have been hospitalized, up two, and two have died, which is unchanged.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 771, up 43 from Wednesday. The age group makes up 19.3% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 42 have been hospitalized and one has died, both of which are unchanged from Wednesday.

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the third-highest number of cases with 719, up 38 from Wednesday. Residents in their 50s make up 18% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 95 have been hospitalized, up three, and four have died, the latter of which is unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 677, up 38 from Wednesday. Residents in their 20s make up 16.9% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 27 have been hospitalized, up two, but none have died.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 213, up 22 from Wednesday. The group makes up 5.3% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county's children -- those ages 9 and younger -- accounted for 99 cases, up 10 from Wednesday. Children under 9 comprise 2.5% of the county's total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 99 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, two have been hospitalized and none have died, which is also unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 386 cases, up 19 from Wednesday. The age group makes up 9.7%, of the county's total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 64 have been hospitalized, up two, and 13 have died, up one from Wednesday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 146 cases, up 10 from Wednesday. They comprise 3.7% of the county's total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 146 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 43 have been hospitalized, up one, and 22 have died, up one since Wednesday. 

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Tuesday, 107 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up three from Wednesday.

Of those, 35 have been hospitalized, up one from Wednesday, and 32 have died, also up one from Wednesday

Wednesday, May 13: Prince William reports  221 health care workers with COVID-19, 4 more outbreaks in long-term care facilities

Prince William County Health District now is reporting 12 local COVID-19 outbreaks, including 11 in long-term care facilities, which is an increase of four from last week.

The county health district is also reporting Wednesday that 221 local health care workers have tested positive for COVID-19, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

The state report began adding COVID-19 case information on local health care workers about a week ago, but provides no additional information about where the health care workers are employed or whether they have been hospitalized as a result of their illness.

Regarding local outbreaks, the 12 reported on Wednesday, May 13, have resulted in 109 cases of COVID-19. Accordingly, the outbreaks make up less than 3% of the county health district's 3,792 cases.

The state health department refuses to release the location of the long-term care facility outbreaks, however, because of privacy laws.

Due to local news reports, outbreaks have so far been reported at Arbor Terrace Sudley Manor, Birmingham Green and Lake Manassas Heath and Rehabilitation

The information about outbreaks and cases among health care workers accompanied a May 13 COVID-19 report that showed another spike in new cases across the state, which rose to 946, up 216 from the 730 new cases reported Tuesday.

Virginia now has a total of 26,746 cases of COVID-19 and 927 deaths, which is an additional 36 deaths in the past 24 hours.

Locally, the Prince William County Health District reported 145 new COVID-19 cases, which include 103 new cases in the county, 29 in the City of Manassas and 13 in the City of Manassas Park.

Local deaths: The county health district is reporting eight additional deaths: seven in Prince William and one in the City of Manassas. Local deaths blamed on COVID-19 now stand at 72, which include 40 women and 32 men. 

As of Wednesday, the health district had lost 31 residents ages 80 or older, up five; 21 in their 70s, up two; and 13 in their 60s, up one. Meanwhile, there have been four deaths among residents in their 50s; two in their 40s; and one in their 30s, all unchanged from Tuesday.

Virginia's key measures: Among key measures Virginia officials are watching ahead of lifting pandemic restrictions, which is now set happen on Friday in all but Northern Virginia, both hospitalizations and the percent of overall tests that are positive both ticked down on Wednesday.

Overall tests administered daily continues to fluctuate, however, and remains well below the 10,000 goal of daily tests Gov. Ralph Northam set before reopening the state's economy.

Virginia hospitalizations: The VDH's statewide tally of cumulative hospitalizations due to COVID-19 rose to 3,520, up 125 from the 3,395 reported Tuesday. 

According to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association, there were 1,526 people currently hospitalized for confirmed and probable cases of COVID-19 across Virginia on Tuesday, down three from Tuesday's total of 1,529. That includes 364 people in intensive care, up 10, and 202 people on ventilators, up one.

Also as of Tuesday, 3,554 COVID-19 patients had been released from the hospital, up 154 from Tuesday's report.

The rolling, seven-day average of daily hospitalizations ticked down from 1,573 on Tuesday to 1,563 on Wednesday. 

Regarding tests, the VDH is reporting that 5,098 people were tested on Tuesday, May 12, while 3,373 were tested on Monday, May 11, and 5,875 on Sunday, May 10. The rolling, seven-day average of new tests ticked down from 6,600 on Monday to 6,506 on Tuesday.

The rolling, seven-day average of positive cases relative to new tests statewide ticked down from 15% on Tuesday, May 12, to 14% on Wednesday, May 13.

Regarding cases of COVID-19, the seven-day rolling average of new daily cases ticked up from 792 on Tuesday to 823 on Wednesday, May 13, the VDH reported.

Northern Virginia deaths: Fairfax County Health District continues to lead the state in COVID-19 deaths with 262, up nine from Tuesday's report. 

Across Northern Virginia, COVID-19 is blamed for 483 deaths, including 262 in Fairfax, up nine; four in Falls Church, unchanged; 69 in Arlington, up three; 65 in Prince William, up seven; four in the City of Manassas, up one; three in Manassas Park, unchanged; 38 in Loudoun County, up three; five in Fauquier County, unchanged; four in Stafford County, and four in Spotsylvania, both unchanged.

Fairfax City has three deaths, which is also unchanged.

Northern Virginia hospitalizations: The Prince William Health District reported 376 hospitalizations, up 19 from Tuesday's report. The local health district is reporting the second-highest number of hospitalizations in the state. Fairfax County continues to report the highest number of hospitalizations in Virginia with 999, up 27 from Tuesday's report.

Northern Virginia cases: The Northern Virginia region now has a cumulative total of at least 15,461 cases of COVID-19.

They include 1,305 in Alexandria, up 65 over the past 24 hours; 1,460 in Arlington, up 44; 459  in the City of Manassas, up 29; 152 in Manassas Park, up 13; 6,666 in Fairfax County, up 196; 190 in Fauquier County, up 10; 1,283 in Loudoun County, up 73; 3,181 in Prince William County, up 103; 270 in Spotsylvania County, up nine; and 413 in Stafford County, up 17.

Prince William cases, deaths according to age: 

Cases are highest among working-age residents ages 30 to 59

On Wednesday, the VDH report continued to show that Prince William Health District residents between the ages of 40 and 49 are reporting the highest number of COVID-19, with 834, up 34 from Tuesday. The age group makes up 22.1%, of the county's total cases.

Among 40-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 72 have been hospitalized, up two, and two have died, which is unchanged.

County residents between the ages of 30 and 39 are reporting the next-highest number of cases with 728, up 22 from Tuesday. The age group makes up 19.3% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 30-something Prince William residents who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 42 have been hospitalized, up three, and one has died, the latter of which is unchanged. 

County health district residents between the ages of 50 to 59 make up the third-highest number of cases with 681, up 23 from Tuesday. Residents in their 50s make up 18.1% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 50-somethings who have fallen ill with COVID-19, 92 have been hospitalized, up seven, and four have died, the latter of which is unchanged.

County health district residents between the ages of 20 and 29 make up the fourth-highest number of cases with 639, up 30 from Tuesday. Residents in their 20s make up 17% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 20-something residents who have fallen ill from COVID-19, 25 have been hospitalized, but none have died. Both are unchanged.

Kids and teens between the ages of 10 and 19 reported the sixth-highest number of COVID-19 cases with 191, up 11 from Tuesday. The group makes up 5.1% of the county's COVID-19 cases.

Among 10- to 19-year-olds who have tested positive for COVID-19, three have been hospitalized and none have died, both of which are unchanged.

The county's children -- those ages 9 and younger -- accounted for 89 cases, up four from Monday. Children under 9 comprise 2.4% of the county's total number of cases, the lowest number of any age group.

Among the 89 children ages 9 and under who have tested positive for the disease, two have been hospitalized and none have died, which is also unchanged.

Older residents have fewer cases, but more hospitalizations, deaths

County residents between the ages of 60 and 69, meanwhile, make up the fifth-highest number of cases, with 367 cases, up 11 from Tuesday. The age group makes up 9.7%, of the county's total number of cases.

Among 60-somethings, 64 have been hospitalized, up two, and 13 have died, up one from Tuesday. 

County residents between the ages of 70 and 79 make up the seventh-highest number of cases in the county with 136 cases, up seven from Tuesday. They comprise 3.6% of the county's total COVID-19 cases.

Of the 136 residents in their 70s who have tested positive for the disease, 42 have been hospitalized, up four, and 21 have died, up two since Tuesday. 

County residents ages of 80 and older account for the second-lowest number of cases and but the highest number of deaths.

As of Tuesday, 104 county residents age 80 and older have tested positive for COVID-19, up four from Tuesday. Of those, 34 have been hospitalized, up one from Tuesday, and 31 have died, up five from Tuesday.

 

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(31) comments

Jia7c

New here. I took a test last Tuesday/Wednesday in Manassas. They still haven’t called me. Called the people doing the test they state they don’t handle the results and someone will call this week.

Marty

Our inept governor and his staff should travel, to Florida to learn how to handle the virus.

Omarndc72

Let businesses set their rules for dealing with the public in a safe manner till this blows over. Keep the beurocrats and politicians quarantine in Richmond, leave the rest of us alone.

zcxnissan

Its obvious it peaked in April by any metric. Obvious and deliberate overreaction by the Governor.

ed1

Peaked yes but due to the lack of appropriate measures by people out and about, it's declining at an alarming slow rate.

Marty

Looks like the governor is incapable of managing the virus crisis. Things are going from bad to worse by the day.

Omarndc72

You want to see how fast they open. ? Stop paying all of the state employees and politicians from governor down. Then you see how fast the politicians change.

Jameson

What is going to change by June 10th that will allow businesses to re-open. I can only imagine he will try to push the date back again.

someone

As more people are tested, more people will test positive for COVID-19. Flu viruses can hang-around for years. So, businesses could be closed for years.

zcxnissan

Its insane to do that you know that right?

joatmon

Because people are impatient and not taking it as seriously as they should. The stay at home order needs to be strictly enforced and more businesses need to shut down. I'm sorry, but McDonalds and Starbucks aren't essential. I see kids continuing to play on playgrounds and teenagers socializing because they are too dumb to realize the ramifications of their actions, nor do they care because they seem no threat to themselves. I received an email from a painting contractor the other day saying they are open and operating as an essential business. Really!? Stay home people or this will never get better!

Marty

We need to shut down 75% of the government, it is also not essential. Then we shall see how fast everything reopens. For the people who work at McDonalds, McDonalds is essential.

zcxnissan

Brad take your gibberish elsewhere fascist. More people are dying of murder, suicide and other health conditions because of quarantines and lock downs then this bad year flu. If you had practiced better eating and sanitary habits we probably wouldn't even have to discuss this you confused gender fool. Go see a psychiatrist.

Omarndc72

Its simple, go back to work. If your sick dont go out stay home till is passed. Stay away from elder people and wash your hands dont touch your face.

weouchere

InsideCommenter + Brad = Morons. Were you idiots calling him out for acting too soon before you started saying he acted too late like the rest of the Libtard party?

InsideCommenter

weouchere + zcxnissan = batshit crazy morons. I was never calling him out for acting too soon, he acted to late if we had started these measures two weeks earlier we would've been able to avoid 90% of the cases. The gas-lighting and lies you all do are just hilarious.

zcxnissan

Actually it has been noted by many medical studies that blacks are more susceptible because they have many underlying conditions like obesity, heart disease, diabetes, unhealthy lifestyles. Social distancing is not being practiced in the cities. That's obvious. See New York City. Also wondering why nursing home death statistics are not being reported properly. They are ginning up the totals trying to use any disaster for political advantage. InsideCommenter and Brad your TDS is obvious.

zcxnissan

The numbers in Chesterfield pale in comparison to Democrat cities and counties nationwide.

InsideCommenter

Ignorant statement of the article award has now been granted. A virus will spread where more people live, places that are more densely populated are naturally where the virus will spread faster. Despite this Democratic areas have been doing better than Red states who are whining like crybabies about not being able to get a haircut or dine in, a rise in cases in the state of Kentucky was attributed to fascist protests about the stay at home orders.

zcxnissan

Gaslighting was a mastery first aced by Tamanny Hall democrats and passed on from generation to generation. From there to democrat Klansmen and segregationists. Even up to the modern day. Nowadays they have turned more fascistic/communist with their green new deals and universal incomes. Not to mention the bs being slung about global warming/climate change, or whatever they will call it next week.

Brad

Look, people are dying because of this terrible disease. Why don't you take your lies and obsessions to some neo-conservative chat room, no one wants to read your gibberish here.

InsideCommenter

What is this hot pile of garbage you call an argument. All you do is name call talk about facts and logic not whatever you saw on Facebook.

ed1

All he said was people are dying. That is accurate. Nationally we've had more deaths in a month than from a year with flu and that's with all the social distancing. If you're not capable of taking in seriously or don't want to be stuck at home, please at least where a mask and avoid contact with others.

InsideCommenter

ed1,

I agree with the one who talked about the mortality of this grave disease. The one who I was rebutting was zcxnissan who constantly trolls and makes up lies.

Joemama

If these non-essential democrats would stay home it would stop spreading.

InsideCommenter

Maybe if the orange cheeto and his cultists would stay at their home instead of prancing around we could flatten the curve.

Brad

Or maybe if the orange cheeto and his cultists had done their job timely and correctly in the first place these unfortunates might not have been infected or died.

zcxnissan

I guess going to Chinatown doesn't count if your Nancy Pelosi. So many lies, it comes natural to the old bat. She's probably a super spreader. She probably used hydroxychloroquine as an antidote.

ed1

Why would she use an unproven, dangerous drug pushed by trump. Was he being sarcastic about that one as well or only about disinfectant and really bright lights?

zcxnissan

Funny how most of the deaths are in Democrat cities and states. I guess they don't follow rules or laws.

InsideCommenter

Chesterfield is heavily Republican and has many cases. Anyhow cases tend to be in areas that have a larger population. Has nothing to do with political affiliation or rule following.

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