League of Women Voters in Richmond

League of Women Voters members Lois Page and Lynn Johnston regularly attend the weekly roundtables. 

RICHMOND, Va. -- Every Wednesday during the legislative session, the Virginia chapter of the League of Women Voters hosts a roundtable featuring legislators and speakers before members head to the State Capitol and lobby lawmakers. 

Deb Wake, president of the Virginia chapter, considers education a priority for the nonpartisan political organization and utilizes the members’ experience and knowledge to cultivate different perspectives.

“We’re always trying to learn and take advantage of the power of our membership,” Wake said. 

The group started with a discussion of gun control bills, citing the recent massive gun rights rally as a wake-up call to create stricter legislation.

“There's the right to gun ownership, but there's also the right to be free from intimidation by the people who show up with their firepower for the express purpose of intimidation,” Wake said.

The league was joined this week by the American Civil Liberties Union and the groups promoted criminal justice reform legislation. Both want lawmakers to eliminate the use of solitary confinement, calling it “inhumane.”

Last year, the General Assembly passed a law requiring state prisons to report data on prisoners placed in solitary confinement, including information on their sex, ethnicity, race, age, mental health and medical status. Prisons also must report why and how long a prisoner has been placed in solitary confinement and the security level of the confinement. The ACLU feels that it is not enough. 

“Solitary confinement jeopardizes public safety, wastes taxpayer dollars, and can cause serious lifelong psychological harm and trauma,” the ACLU stated. 

Justin Patterson, a correctional officer at Sussex 1 State Prison in Sussex County, said the mental health effects of solitary confinement depends on the situation.

“I've seen offenders who have been in solitary confinement for years thriving in population now. I've seen people who have been in there for weeks and start to lose it,” Patterson said. “It's a case by case basis in my experience.”

House Bill 1284, introduced by Del. Patrick Hope, D-47th, of Arlington, would “prohibit the use of isolated confinement in state correctional facilities and juvenile correctional centers.” It is currently sitting in a subcommittee.

According to the Virginia Department of Corrections, short-term solitary confinement was reduced by 66% from January 2016 to June 2019 as a part of their Restrictive Housing Pilot Program.

Patterson argues that solitary confinement is necessary within the prison system.

“We are dealing with very dangerous individuals in an environment which breeds violence,” Patterson said. “Solitary confinement isn't just used as a disciplinary procedure, it's also used for safety purposes.”

The ACLU also wants to change the definition of petit larceny, thefts less than $500, which they said is one of the lowest in the country. It wants to raise the threshold to $1,500, according to Ashna Khanna, legislative director. A House bill proposing that change died last year in a committee. 

“We're seeing this entire system of how people are becoming disenfranchised, how people are becoming incarcerated, and we know that it disproportionately is black or brown people,” Khanna said.

Del. Joseph Lindsey, D-90th, of Norfolk, and Del. Kaye Kory, D-38th, of Falls Church, proposed HB 101, which would increase the grand larceny minimum to $750, but a Courts of Justice subcommittee voted down the measure Friday. 

Gov. Ralph Northam (D) has voiced support for current legislation to raise the grand larceny threshold to $1,000, doubling the threshold that it was raised to in the previous session.

The League of Women Voters and the ACLU also are working on reforming the pretrial system, which the ACLU said largely affects communities of color who may not be able to afford bail.

Other topics discussed at the round table included no-excuse absentee voting and legalizing marijuana. The ACLU has voiced opposition to current legislation proposing the decriminalization of marijuana, in favor of legalization.

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(5) comments

Omarndc72

You want criminal reform? Make them work 6 days 12 hours a day with no pay. Construction, cleaning what ever the state needs done. I bet criminals will think twice knowing they will be working 6 days a week 12 hours 30 min lunch break. Thats how you reform and help the community.

JosephGeorge4Neabsco

Great job as always ladies!!!

cultured2014

the league of women voters call themselves "non partisan" however ALL of the issues they support or push are progressive in nature.

cultured2014

for the group none of this is "non-partisan" these are democrat/progressive leaning groups. they of course dont talk about the republican bills that increased penalties for firearms violations were scuttled by the house and senate because they would apparently disproportionally affect minorities.

Donald Stanton

Yes I agreed with you far the gun control for the ones who wants to killed people's with these's gun's in virginia. the Republican want's this to happen to african american are the one's getting killed by the police and other's group of people's.

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